Infographic: Mentoring Goes a Long Way

This week LearningYourDevelopment is focusing on mentoring, which is perceived to be one of the most important elements in effective professional development, playing a key role in talent strategy, leadership development and even performance management. The appeal of mentoring, to both mentors and mentees, is universal; while many believe that Millennials prefer to be plugged in to their development, the opposite is true: 75% of Millennials want a mentor, while 65% of Baby Boomers have been sought out for guidance by Millennials (1). To those looking to engage Millennials in professional development, particularly in leadership roles, and to increase engagement and staff retention, this is a key statistic, because it means that appealing to Millennials through their love of technology may not be the best solution. Watch this space, there is a video and an article to come on how you can use mentoring and structured mentoring programs to build and improve on your organisation’s knowledge capital.

Mentoring Infographic

 

 

  1. http://www.psychotactics.com/art-retain-learning/

Video: Why 70:20:10 is Failing

As promised, I’ve put together a video to go with the post from earlier this week regarding the 70:20:10 principle. I firmly believe that the 70:20:10 ratio can work, however thus far it is failing to deliver on its potential due to a lack of structure and resources.

I am indebted to Moovly, whose wonderful software I have utilised to create this video, and to http://www.bensound.com for the wonderful backing music. As always, I appreciate any and all feedback, hope that you enjoy the video, and invite you to share it if you feel that it suits your needs.

Video: Performance Management: Improving on Traditional Offerings

I read an excellent article regarding the incredible statistic that only 4% of staff feel that performance reviews are useful here, and it really made me think. Why do we stick to formats that don’t produce results? A set and forget mindset is never going to create real change or development with measurable results, so let’s talk about how to do it differently. Let’s talk about how to turn annual reviews into a constant and continuous process that involves supporting and guiding staff to develop themselves in ways that benefit the business and allow employees to move further along in their chosen career path. If employee engagement is a problem, then let’s find new ways to get employees to engage. To that end, I produced this video with the help of an awesome online program from biteable.com, so I want to shout out to those guys for making a fantastic product, and encourage others to try it out. The findings and numbers in the video come from the article above about the survey run by Bamboo HR. I’ve enabled the option to download and share the video, and if you choose to do so, I would appreciate it if you linked back to this blog post because it did take effort to get it together. Thank you!

There are No Financial Barriers to Making an Effective Training Video

The biggest mental barrier to creating videos as learning and development resources is the perceived need to invest excessive time and money into unfamiliar and highly technical equipment and software to produce a premium product. Videos can be hugely expensive, and creating a micro-learning gallery of videos can be perceived to be well beyond the reach of smaller organisations. Costs incurred in instructional design, filming, editing and final production values make companies that are dipping their toes in the online learning environment very reluctant to move in any direction where ROI can be complicated to calculate, and upfront costs are many and varied.

This is an outdated stigma. Video doesn’t need to be this complex to create. It doesn’t need to be expensive and involve a lot of heavy production values to make it engaging, informative and effective. An excellent example of this is the Paperslide video series; these training videos are created in one take using a mobile phone, immediately removing the financial barrier of entry for smaller organisations looking to begin offering resources in this format. They are visually engaging, and cleverly utilise the short time given to the micro-learning topic presented.

There is no longer any excuse not to embrace video as a part of your learning and development offering, and to do so on a minimal budget with highly effective results.